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NASA and the U.S. Air Force Test a New Ground-Based GPS



 
 
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Old December 29th 15, 06:46 PM posted to sci.geo.satellite-nav
Sam Wormley[_2_]
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Posts: 775
Default NASA and the U.S. Air Force Test a New Ground-Based GPS

NASA and the U.S. Air Force Test a New Ground-Based GPS
http://www.scientificamerican.com/ar...und-based-gps/


Locata's system resolves this issue by layering in an independent
network of transceivers that communicate over ground. A test last
year in Washington, D.C., by the U.S. Naval Observatory, the division
responsible for maintaining the GPS master clock, found that Locata's
web of signals synced up within 200 trillionths of a second, more
than 50 times faster than GPS. And unlike GPS, the signals are strong
enough to pass through walls. “We're analogous to a Wi-Fi hotspot,”
explains Locata CEO and co-founder Nunzio Gambale, who has been
designing the system for some 20 years.

The system most likely is a decade from the consumer market but has
proved successful so far in commercial partnerships, including a
recent deal with the nasa Langley Research Center, where the
technology assists tests of unmanned aircraft safety systems. Locata
networks also have helped assess the efficacy of vehicle
crash-avoidance systems at the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety
and have been used to monitor U.S. Air Force aircraft locations at
the White Sands Missile Range in New Mexico, where GPS is currently
jammed to simulate warfare environments.

Ideally Locata transceivers would be integrated into all cellular
towers, bringing centimeter-level location accuracy to everyday
consumers, Gambale says. And receivers eventually will be small
enough to embed in smartphones and thousands of other connected
devices, ranging from watches to dog tags to self-driving cars. “The
next-generation systems need a lot of synchronization,” he says. “So
the Internet of Things, which is inevitable and coming, raises the
bar enormously.”


  #2  
Old December 29th 15, 06:47 PM posted to sci.geo.satellite-nav
Alan Browne
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,338
Default NASA and the U.S. Air Force Test a New Ground-Based GPS

On 2015-12-29 14:46, Sam Wormley wrote:
NASA and the U.S. Air Force Test a New Ground-Based GPS
http://www.scientificamerican.com/ar...und-based-gps/


Locata's system resolves this issue by layering in an independent
network of transceivers that communicate over ground. A test last
year in Washington, D.C., by the U.S. Naval Observatory, the division
responsible for maintaining the GPS master clock, found that Locata's
web of signals synced up within 200 trillionths of a second, more
than 50 times faster than GPS. And unlike GPS, the signals are strong
enough to pass through walls. “We're analogous to a Wi-Fi hotspot,”
explains Locata CEO and co-founder Nunzio Gambale, who has been
designing the system for some 20 years.

The system most likely is a decade from the consumer market but has
proved successful so far in commercial partnerships, including a
recent deal with the nasa Langley Research Center, where the
technology assists tests of unmanned aircraft safety systems. Locata
networks also have helped assess the efficacy of vehicle
crash-avoidance systems at the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety
and have been used to monitor U.S. Air Force aircraft locations at
the White Sands Missile Range in New Mexico, where GPS is currently
jammed to simulate warfare environments.

Ideally Locata transceivers would be integrated into all cellular
towers, bringing centimeter-level location accuracy to everyday
consumers, Gambale says. And receivers eventually will be small
enough to embed in smartphones and thousands of other connected
devices, ranging from watches to dog tags to self-driving cars. “The
next-generation systems need a lot of synchronization,” he says. “So
the Internet of Things, which is inevitable and coming, raises the
bar enormously.”


Very interesting. Thanks Sam.


--
"But I am somehow extraordinarily lucky, for a guy with ****ty luck."
..Harrison Ford, Rolling Stone - 2015-12-02
 




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